Meditations on Wholeness in Christ: Participating in Easter

Posted on March 31st, 2018

 

Cleanse out the old leaven that you may be a new lump, as you really are unleavened.
For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed.
Let us therefore celebrate the festival,
not with the old leaven, the leaven of malice and evil,
but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.
I Corinthians 5:7-8 ESV
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In prayer, we see Him on the cross, and we take our place in His crucified body. We actually see this with the eyes of our heart as the spiritual reality is taking place. Then we see even our failure to achieve a sense of being, our horrific fear of falling into the abyss of nonbeing, taken up into His greater Being and sacrifice.
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We have confidence to enter the Most Holy Place 
by the blood of Jesus, 
by a new and living way opened for us 
through the curtain, that is, his body.
Hebrews 10:19
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We pass through “the curtain, that is, his body,” dying to the old diseased forms of love we have clung to as well as to the unspeakable loneliness and pain of being disrelated at this most basic of all levels. Forgiving others as well as all the circumstances of our lives, we rise with Him in newness of life. Born anew, we take our place in His resurrected Being. In the cross there is healing; in His resurrected body and life there is identity and being. [1]
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We glorify our King as we enter in to His death and life, as we appropriate the healing and identity He has won for us.  Let us leave even more of our stains and disfigurements in the tomb.  Let us come forth that much more humble, more radiantly transparent as He shines through us.  To celebrate is to participate, and to participate in the Paschal mystery is to truly live.
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PRAYER:  Come Holy Spirit and rend the veil.  Open to us the power of the cross, the grave, and the skies that we might truly partake of Christ’s offering.  Make our Easter observance an encounter, our celebration a participation.  We lift our faces to You, gracious Father, confident in Your Son, and receive life.

[1] Leanne Payne, The Broken Image (Grand Rapids, Baker Books, 1996), 112.
Painting:  Leonard Limousin, 1553, The Resurrection [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 

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