Creation of Being

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day. Genesis 1:1-5

God the Father, who has the Power of Being, heals and affirms us. By fiat He spoke the worlds into existence; by fiat He can and does create in us a new and solid sense of being. Through healing prayer, this process (God’s fiat) is greatly quickened. Healing prayer, rightly understood and ministered, is the most creative work in the world, for through it a way is made for God’s command to be uttered, and by it the soul is made ready to hear and receive it.[1]

The God who said, “Let there be light” by divine command speaks to us, “Let there be being!” and creates in us a solid sense of being. As He created the earth out of nothing He creates being in us through healing prayer. He blesses and affirms our masculinity and femininity, and where there has been an empty void in our hearts caused by wounds and deprivations, He fills it with a sense of solidity. We cannot fail to have hope for our redemption in His image when we contemplate the immensity of God’s being. 

PRAYER

Holy God, we know that you alone have the power of being. You can create in us a new sense of being. Help us to remember your immensity of being and not our own failings and inadequacies. We open our hearts to You now and welcome the creation of our beings. Thank you for making us solid and secure, knit together by Your power of being.  

 [1] Leanne Payne, Healing Presence (Grand Rapids, Baker Books, 1994), p. 54.

Painting: Jan Bruegel the Younger, 1601-1678, God creating the Sun, the Moon and the Stars [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Meditation prepared by Mary Carrington, drawing on the writings and ministry of Leanne Payne.